My Hometown Ogden Project Beautifies Neighborhoods and Builds Relationships Through Community Service | News, Sports, Jobs


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My Hometown Ogden initiative volunteers are pictured doing service work at a home in Ogden on Saturday September 10, 2022.

Photo provided, Ogden City

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My Hometown Ogden initiative volunteers are pictured doing service work at a home in Ogden on Saturday September 10, 2022.

Photo provided, Ogden City

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A My Hometown Ogden initiative volunteer is pictured alongside the River Ogden on Saturday September 10, 2022.

Photo provided, Ogden City

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Volunteers from the My Hometown Ogden initiative are pictured doing service work along the River Ogden on Saturday September 10, 2022.

Photo provided, Ogden City

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My Hometown Ogden initiative volunteers are pictured doing service work at a home in Ogden on Saturday September 10, 2022.

Photo provided, Ogden City

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A My Hometown Ogden initiative volunteer is pictured alongside the River Ogden on Saturday September 10, 2022.

Photo provided, Ogden City

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OGDEN – More than 1,000 volunteers came together Saturday morning to serve the community as part of the My Hometown Ogden initiative, a joint effort of the town of Ogden, local churches and other organizations with a vision of beautify local properties while spreading kindness to residents.

Volunteers performed a variety of tasks throughout the city, including picking up debris, painting, repairing fences, planting trees and building wheelchair ramps.

Saturday marked the city’s fourth service day of the year, with 4,800 volunteers working 9,900 service hours to help 287 homeowners.

Block captains helped inspect the exteriors of homes, asking homeowners about any work outside the home they needed help with because they weren’t meeting interior needs.

Ogden City Marketing and Communications Manager Mike McBride said homeowners and neighbors came to help and engage with volunteers, not realizing the purpose of the initiative was to raise the civility, community involvement, safety and health protocols and fostering love for one another.

“The hope of the whole project is to lend a helping hand, not a helping hand,” McBride said.

Although supported by Ogden City administration and staff, funding for My Hometown service projects is provided by private donors.

The initiative, new to both Ogden and Provo this year, is based on a similar hometown service project in West Valley City established in 2019.

Of the many local churches participating in hometown initiatives, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is said to be the largest organization contributing the most volunteers; however, this is not a faith-based initiative alone.

McBride said Ogden is fortunate to have a group of people who are passionate about providing services to community members who need them.

“It’s amazing because you’ll have 25 to 30 people in a yard and within an hour it’s day and night,” he said.

Saturday’s service project was unique because of Sunday’s 9/11 National Day of Service. In addition to servicing 55 homes around Lester Park, Liberty Park, High Adventure Park and 770 15th St., volunteers were cleaning up the Ogden River between the bridge on Gramercy Avenue and Monroe Boulevard.

The final day of My Hometown Ogden service this year is scheduled for October 22, and while the volunteers plan to serve homeowners in other parts of town, they will end 2022 focusing on the same areas.

“There’s such a need and we’ve been able to help so many people,” McBride said.



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Norma P. Rex